Wondrous Wildlife

By Vern and Lori Geiger

The Old Man’s Head

 

tayra_085Everyone is familiar with Mexico’s little burros sporting a sombrero or the green iguanas with a colorful serape, but when one ventures beyond the tourist zones, you have a chance of seeing some truly amazing animals you’ve probably never heard of.

One such species is the Tayra, a cousin of the weasel and the otter. But, it looks more like something from the ‘Island of Dr. Moreau’, with a dog-like head and wrinkled facial skin on a mink-like body. Most tayras have dark brown or black fur with a lighter patch on its chest. The fur on its head changes to brown or gray as it ages.

Tayras live in the tropical forests of the Yucatan as well as Central and South America. Typically denning in hollow trees or burrows in the ground, they also may make nests in tall grass. They are a diurnal species usually traveling alone or in pairs; however, on occasions they may be seen in small groups of three to four individuals. They are particularly active at dusk and just before dawn. Tayras are both terrestrial and arboreal, and very fast runners. Despite their limited eyesight they are expert climbers. They have been reported to climb down smooth tree trunks from heights of greater than 40 meters. Terrestrial locomotion is usually composed of erratic, bouncing movements much like that of a ferret; with the back arched and the tail along the ground. Arboreal movements among the branches are fluid and graceful.

Tayras are omnivores and will eat almost anything, feeding on rodents and invertebrates, as well as tastier thing such as eggs and honey. Not to mention fruit; they can frequently be found raiding orchards. Tayras are quite social and playful and easily tamed. Indigenous peoples, who often refer to the tayra as cabeza del viejo, or old man’s head, in years past, kept them as household pets to control vermin. Today wild tayra populations are shrinking, especially in Mexico, due to habitat destruction for agricultural purposes.

Despite their wide distribution and relatively large size, scientifically speaking, surprisingly little is known about tayra, as to their reproduction, life span, home ranges and habits. It is documented that after a gestation of 63 to 70 days the female gives birth to a litter of two to three babies. Newborns open their eyes in about five to eight days and they nurse for two to three months. Some researchers believe this is per season with births occurring March thru July. Others believe that the tayra has monthly mating periods and is a non-seasonal breeder. Obviously researchers have much to learn about these curious creatures.

We would like to thank all our volunteers for their continued support at various events, and remind all that this time of year is especially difficult for wildlife; for those who live in country settings think about putting out a shallow container of water for wildlife, they will thank you for a drink and will be less likely to venture into your garden. If you find a wild animal in need of help you may contact us or if we are unavailable, you may contact the Fire Dept. 766-3615. If you are able to assist the animal, you can take it to Dr. Pepe Magaña in Riberas for treatment.

primi sui motori con e-max

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Parched Dreams By Tom Eck   As she lay in the shade, Zahra knew the end was near. The morning trek had been marked more by the time she crawled
  The Conservative Corner By Robert L. Nipper December 2014 What a Disappointment! November 2014  The Conservative
December 2014 Please select one: Online format Only articles (respond to any article here) Magazine style format Articles
Editor’s Page By Alejandro Grattan-Dominguez For more editorials, visit: http://thedarksideofthedream.com   (Note: Given President Obama’s
The Life And Lessons Of St. Francis Of Assisi By Dr. Lorin Swinehart   It was a bitterly cold Christmas Eve in 1223, in the tiny Italian mountain

Our Issues

November 2014

july2011-ojo

October 2014

july2011-ojo

September 2014

july2011-ojo

August 2014

july2011-ojo

July 2014

july2011-ojo

June 2014

july2011-ojo

May 2014

july2011-ojo

 

More....